Who are Unitarian Universalists?

We are a religious people who have woven strands of a rich past into a tapestry of the present. Read more >>

How did the movement come to have such a long name?

In North America, Unitarianism and Universalism developed separately. Universalist congregations began to be established in the 1770s. Other congregations, many established earlier, began to take the Unitarian name in the 1820s. Over the decades the two groups converged in their liberal emphasis and style, and in 1961 they merged to become the Unitarian Universalist Association.

Where can one find Unitarian Universalist congregations now?

More than one thousand congregations in the United States and Canada belong to the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) of Congregations, with headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts. Read more >>

What do UUs believe about God?

Some Unitarian Universalists are nontheists and do not find language about God useful. The faith of other Unitarian Universalists in God may be profound, though among these, too, talk of God may be restrained. Read more >>

What about Jesus?

Classically, Unitarian Universalist Christians have understood Jesus as a savior because he was a God-filled human being, not a supernatural being. Read more >>

What do you believe about the Bible?

In most of our congregations, our children learn Bible stories as a part of their religious education curricula. It is not unusual to find adult study groups in congregations, or in workshops at summer camps and conferences, focusing on the Bible. Read more >>

How do UUs understand salvation?

The English word salvation derives from the Latin salus, meaning health. Unitarian Universalists are as concerned with salvation, in the sense of spiritual health or wholeness, as any other religious people. Read more >>

What ceremonies are observed, what holidays celebrated?

Our ceremonies– of marriage, civil union, and starting a new family, naming or dedicating our children, and memorializing our dead– are phrased in simple, contemporary language. Read more >>